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Dangerous or vicious dogs- Unlawful acts; penalties

Nevada Laws on Dangerous or Vicious Dogs

Nevada has made many different kinds of unsafe behavior illegal in Chapter 202 of Title 15, which is a chapter of the state’s penal code that criminalizes conduct because of the risk the conduct presents to public health and safety.

There are different subcategories in Chapter 202 that different kinds of offenses against public health and safety are grouped into. One such subcategory, miscellaneous crimes against public safety, criminalizes conduct that has no common trend other than all of the different types of wrongful behavior present a danger to the public at large.

One of the statutes found with the miscellaneous crimes section of Chapter 202 relates to dangerous or vicious dogs. The law establishes the rules for unlawful acts associated with dangerous or vicious dogs and imposes penalties upon owners for unlawful conduct.

Many of the penalties are very serious in connection with dangerous or vicious dog offenses and you need to understand what the elements of the crime are as well as the consequences you could face if convicted. You also need to develop an effective legal strategy for responding to accusations that could affect your future. LV Criminal Defense can help, so give us a call to find out about the personalized representation our Las Vegas criminal lawyers can offer as you fight charges.

Nevada Revised Statute Section 202.500: Unlawful Acts with a Dangerous or Vicious Dog

The statute within Chapter 202 that addresses dangerous or vicious dogs is Nevada Revised Statute section 202.500. According to the relevant law, a dog is considered to be dangerous if, without provocation, on two separate occasions in an 18 month period, the dog behaves menacingly to a degree that would cause a reasonable person to defend himself against substantial bodily harm at the time when the dog is off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined to a cage or a vehicle. For purposes of this statute, provoked refers to the dog being tormented or being subject to pain.

A dog is considered to be vicious if the dog has killed or inflicted substantial bodily harm upon a human without being provoked or, after the dog’s owner has been notified by law enforcement that the dog is dangerous, the dog continues the menacing behavior.

A dog can be found to be dangerous if it is used in the commission of a crime by its owner or keeper, but it cannot be considered dangerous or vicious if it takes a defensive action against a person who provokes the dog or against a person who is attempting to commit a crime or committing a crime.

Any person who knowingly owns or keeps a vicious dog for more than seven days after having had actual notice the animal is vicious or who transfers ownership of the vicious dog after having actual notice of its viciousness can be found guilty of a misdemeanor offense.

However, if the dog causes substantial bodily harm in an attack after it is known to be vicious, its owner can be found guilty of a category D felony offense. A judge can also order the vicious dog to be humanely destroyed.

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Getting Help From a Nevada Criminal Defense Attorney

If you are accused of having a vicious or dangerous dog and you are facing criminal penalties, you need to reach out to a Vegas criminal defense lawyer for help fighting accusations of wrongdoing. Our dedicated and experienced legal team can work with you to defend yourself against serious charges, so give LV Criminal Defense a call as soon as possible when you have been accused of wrongdoing.

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