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Duty to report violent or sexual offense against child 12 years of age or younger

Vegas Lawyer Explains Duty to Report Crimes Against Kids

In the state of Nevada, there are certain rules and regulations in place that are designed to protect the public from harm. There are behaviors that have been defined as criminal because those behaviors present a risk to public health and safety. Chapter 202 of Title 15 is the part of Nevada law that defines offenses against public health and safety and that imposes criminal consequences for various types of unsafe conduct.

Statutes within Chapter 202 do more than just define prohibited behaviors. There are also laws within this part of Nevada’s penal code that mandate actions be taken to protect children from harm. For example, there are statutes within Chapter 202 that require reporting under certain circumstances when a crime has been committed against a child.

If you are required to make a report of a possible crime under the statutes in Chapter 202, failure to do so could result in criminal charges. You need to be proactive about responding to accusations of wrongdoing and should reach out to a Vegas defense lawyer for help as soon as accusations are made. LV Criminal Defense can help.

Our compassionate and knowledgeable legal team has provided representation to defendants accused of many violations of Chapter 202 and we can provide the help and support you need to develop and implement a smart legal defense strategy. Give us a call today to find out more.

Nevada Laws on Reporting Crimes Against Children

The statute within Chapter 202 that imposes criminal penalties for not reporting certain crimes against children is found in Nevada Revised Statute section 202.882. According to the relevant statute, unless you fit within one of the exceptions defined within the subsection of Chapter 202 that relates to reporting offenses involving children, you are required to take action if you know, or have reasonable cause to believe, that certain acts have been committed against a child who is 12 years old or younger.

Under N.R.S. 202.882, you are required to make a report if you know, or have reasonable cause to believe, that an act of violence or a sexual offense has been committed against a child 12 or under. The statute requires that you report the alleged violent or sexual offense against the child to a law enforcement agency as soon as it is reasonably practicable for you to do so.

N.R.S. 202.882 also specifies that you must make the report within 24 hours of knowing about the sexual or violent offense against a child, or within 24 hours of having reason to suspect that such an offense has occurred.

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You must include in your report the name of the child who you believe was victimized by the violent act or unlawful sexual act. You are also required to include the name of the individual who you believe committed the act of violence or the illegal sexual conduct. The law also mandates that you provide details on the location where the crime was committed, as well as the facts and the circumstances that led you to believe the offense was committed. ‘

If you do not comply with these obligations by submitting a report if you know or have reason to know about an act of violence or abuse against a child, you can be charged with a misdemeanor offense.

However, there are additional statutes within Chapter 202, including N.R.S. 202.885, which prevent you from being prosecuted unless someone has been convicted of an act of violence or sexual offense against a child, and N.R.S. 202.888, which exempts you from reporting requirements if you are under 16, are mentally or physical impaired, if you know reporting would put you in danger, if you become aware of the offense because of privileged information, or if you are a close relative of the child who is a victim or of the perpetrator of the offense.

Getting Help from a Vegas Criminal Defense Attorney

If you are accused of failing to report violent or sexual offenses against a child when you have a duty to do so, you should get legal help. LV Criminal Defense can fight to help you avoid conviction for this misdemeanor offense, so give us a call today.

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