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Malice and maliciously defined

Nevada Defense Lawyer Defines Malice and Maliciously

In the state of Nevada, many different behaviors have been made unlawful in Title 15 of the Nevada code. Title 15 is the title with Nevada law that deals with crime and punishment. In some cases, the specific crime you will be charged with can vary depending upon your intent and the motive behind your actions. For example, if you act with malice, you could be subject to much harsher penalties.

Since the difference between the consequences for a malicious crime versus a non-malicious crime are dramatic, it is imperative for there to be a clear definition of exactly what malice and maliciously mean. The definitions of these words — and of other important words found within Title 15 — is found in Chapter 193 of Title 15. Chapter 193 is the general provisions section of this title.

Understanding the specific definitions applicable in your case, and navigating Nevada’s criminal code, can be confusing. You owe it to yourself to make sure you have a clear understanding of what you have been charged with and what a prosecutor must prove in order for you to be convicted of a crime.

Your best option to ensure you have a clear understanding of the law is to contact a Las Vegas criminal defense lawyer as soon as you have been charged with. crime. LV Criminal Defense understands the legal language used throughout Nevada’s code and we can provide the help and support you need to fight charges and aim for an acquittal.

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Nick Wooldridge has a long track record of representing clients accused of serious federal and state crimes in Nevada.

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Definition of Malice Under Nevada Law

Both malice and maliciously are defined in Nevada Revised Statute section 193.0175. According to the relevant statute, malice and maliciously both imply that your intent is an evil one. You could act with malice, or act maliciously, under the definition in N.R.S. 193.0175 if your goal or wish is to annoy, injure, or vex another person.

Under the relevant law, it is possible to infer malice based on your actions. If you act with willful disregard to the rights of another person, this willful action could be considered malicious and could imply you have evil intent.

N.R.S. 193.0175 also explains that malice can be inferred when you do a wrongful act without an excuse or without just cause for your actions. An act or omission that betrays one of your duties or that expresses a willful disregard of duties imposed upon people by society can also be evidence of malice.

The term “malice” is found in many different laws within Title 15, and this definition will apply to all of them. For example, Nevada Revised Statute section 200.010 defines the crime of murder as the unlawful killing of another person with express or implied malice aforethought. Because the definition in N.R.S. 193.0175 applies here, you could potentially be found guilty of murder if you made advance plans to kill someone out of a motivation to do evil to that person and if your actions – like acting with willful disregard of your victim – are proven to be a manifestation of your malicious intent.

Contact a Nevada Defense Lawyer Today

A Nevada defense lawyer will help you if you are accused of acting with malice and are facing harsher penalties as a result of these accusations. Our legal team can work closely with you to help you disprove the prosecutor’s claims of malice and to assist you in earning an acquittal or reducing penalties associated with any offense with which you have been charged. To find out more about how our legal team can help you, give us a call at or contact us online today.

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