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Battery with intent to commit a crime

A Vegas Criminal Lawyer Explains Battery with Intent to Commit a Crime

In the state of Nevada, there are many different offenses against persons that are considered to be unlawful. Chapter 200 is the part of Nevada’s criminal code that establishes the definitions of different types of crimes against persons. Within Chapter 200 are various subcategories including homicide offenses, mayhem offenses, and assault and battery crimes. There is also a subsection for battery with the intent to commit a crime.

While you can face penalties for any battery offense, the consequences can become more serious if you are accused of the offense of battery with intent to commit a crime. Because you could be sentenced to a lengthy period of imprisonment for this offense, it is important that you get legal help from a qualified attorney who can fight on your behalf to avoid conviction or to reduce penalties through effective plea negotiation.

When you are hiring a Nevada defense lawyer to help you respond to charges of battery with intent to commit a crime, you want to make sure your attorney has extensive experience with crimes against persons under Chapter 200 of Title 15, which is Nevada’s criminal code. LV Criminal Defense has provided representation to many defendants accused of battery crimes and we can put our extensive legal knowledge to work on your case to help you fight for the best outcome possible.

It’s a good idea to get legal help as soon as you can when you discover you are under investigation for a crime so your lawyer can assist you during the investigation process. Once you have been arrested, having a lawyer is important so your attorney can argue for bail, help you to decide how to plead, and assist you in negotiating a plea deal or going to trial to fight for an acquittal. LV Criminal Defense will be there for you every step of the way, so give us a call for assistance today if you are accused of battery with intent to commit a crime or if you have been charged with any crime against a person under Chapter 200 in Title 15.

Battery with Intent to Commit a Crime Under Nevada Laws

Nevada Revised Statute section 200.400 is the statute that defines the offense of battery with intent to commit a crime. According to the relevant law, the definition of battery for purposes of this statute involves any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon another person. The use of force or violence must be willful, which means that the prosecutor must prove that the defendant who engaged in the violent act acted intentionally.

The penalties for battery with intent to commit a crime will vary depending upon the nature of the underlying crime that the defendant was attempting to commit through the use of force or violence:

• A defendant who commits battery with the intent to commit mayhem, robbery or grand larceny can be found guilty of a Category B felony. The penalty could include a minimum of two years imprisonment and a maximum of 10 years imprisonment along with a fine of up to $10,000.
• A defendant who commits battery with the intent to cause a death can be found guilty of a Category B felony. The penalty could include a minimum of two years imprisonment and a maximum term of imprisonment of up to 20 years. A defendant again could face a maximum $10,000 fine.
• A defendant who commits battery with the intent to commit sexual assault could be charged with a Category A felony if the crime results in substantial bodily harm to the victim or if the defendant strangled the victim. The penalty could include life without the possibility of parole or life with the possibility of parole after a minimum of 10 years have been served, or after a minimum period of time determined appropriate by the jury verdict or by the judge presiding over a bench trial. In addition, a maximum fine of $10,000 could be imposed.
• A defendant who commits battery with the intent to commit sexual assault could be charged with a Category A felony if the crime does not result in substantial bodily harm and the victim is 16 or older. Penalties could include a minimum of two years imprisonment and a maximum term of life imprisonment with the possibility of parole. The defendant could also be fined up to $10,000.
• A defendant who commits battery with the intent to commit sexual assault could be charged with a Category A felony if the victim is a child under the age of 16. Potential penalties include imprisonment for a minimum of five years and a maximum of life imprisonment with the possibility of parole. A fine up to to $10,000 could be imposed as an additional penalty.

A Nevada defense lawyer can provide assistance in determining what specific offense you are likely to be charged with and could help you to understand exactly what a prosecutor would need to prove in order for you to be found guilty.

Contact a Las Vegas Criminal Defense Attorney Today

LV Criminal Defense has provided representation to many defendants who have been accused of battery with intent to commit a crime or who have been accused of other crimes against persons.

Our legal team will put our legal experience to work helping you to analyze the evidence against you in your case to determine the best course of action when you have been charged with battery with intent to commit a crime. To find out more about how our firm can assist you in fighting serious charges that could possibly lead to live imprisonment if you are accused of battery with intent to commit a crime, you should give us a call today.

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